space porn

outer space!
laidbare:

mooshoo:

skunkmonkey:

Via CNN: Scientists spot nearby “super-Earth”
Uh, holy shit?!  There’s a watery planer 40 light years away from Earth that appears to be able to support life (although life very different from us because this planet is a lot hotter with a thicker atmosphere).  So basically what you’re saying is aliens are real and the climate crises = solved.  Get my spaceship and refrigerator suit ready, scientists!  I’m moving!

Awesome! But we need to work on a new name for this super-Earth. It’s current name, “GJ 1214b”, lacks pizzazz.
I nominate “Van Damne” for consideration. Jean-Claude has given us dozens cinematic masterpieces over the years. It’s only fitting we name a planet after him.

laidbare:

mooshoo:

skunkmonkey:

Via CNN: Scientists spot nearby “super-Earth”

Uh, holy shit?!  There’s a watery planer 40 light years away from Earth that appears to be able to support life (although life very different from us because this planet is a lot hotter with a thicker atmosphere).  So basically what you’re saying is aliens are real and the climate crises = solved.  Get my spaceship and refrigerator suit ready, scientists!  I’m moving!

Awesome! But we need to work on a new name for this super-Earth. It’s current name, “GJ 1214b”, lacks pizzazz.

I nominate “Van Damne” for consideration. Jean-Claude has given us dozens cinematic masterpieces over the years. It’s only fitting we name a planet after him.

A mysterious phenomenen of light on the nightsky shocked citizens of northern and mid-Norway on wednesday morning…. …It spun around and exploded in the sky… …It looked like it came over a mountain. First it followed a path, until it disintegrated. Then it suddenly became a huge sphere, so large that it covered the entire sky.  Meteorologists in Tromsø have no idea what caused the light: “We don’t know what it is. I don’t want to assume anything about it, but it appears to have been very spectacular” “People describe the moving light as overwhelming, extremely beautiful, and partially frightening. They describe it as a new years rocket that looks like a spinning spiral.” The phenomenon lasted for a few minutes, just before eight on Wednesday morning. The meteorologist says the light apparently has come from the east.

A mysterious phenomenen of light on the nightsky shocked citizens of northern and mid-Norway on wednesday morning….

…It spun around and exploded in the sky…

…It looked like it came over a mountain. First it followed a path, until it disintegrated. Then it suddenly became a huge sphere, so large that it covered the entire sky.

Meteorologists in Tromsø have no idea what caused the light:

“We don’t know what it is. I don’t want to assume anything about it, but it appears to have been very spectacular”

“People describe the moving light as overwhelming, extremely beautiful, and partially frightening. They describe it as a new years rocket that looks like a spinning spiral.”

The phenomenon lasted for a few minutes, just before eight on Wednesday morning. The meteorologist says the light apparently has come from the east.

A mysterious phenomenen of light on the nightsky shocked citizens of northern and mid-Norway on wednesday morning…. …It spun around and exploded in the sky… …It looked like it came over a mountain. First it followed a path, until it disintegrated. Then it suddenly became a huge sphere, so large that it covered the entire sky.  Meteorologists in Tromsø have no idea what caused the light: “We don’t know what it is. I don’t want to assume anything about it, but it appears to have been very spectacular” “People describe the moving light as overwhelming, extremely beautiful, and partially frightening. They describe it as a new years rocket that looks like a spinning spiral.” The phenomenon lasted for a few minutes, just before eight on Wednesday morning. The meteorologist says the light apparently has come from the east.

A mysterious phenomenen of light on the nightsky shocked citizens of northern and mid-Norway on wednesday morning….

…It spun around and exploded in the sky…

…It looked like it came over a mountain. First it followed a path, until it disintegrated. Then it suddenly became a huge sphere, so large that it covered the entire sky.

Meteorologists in Tromsø have no idea what caused the light:

“We don’t know what it is. I don’t want to assume anything about it, but it appears to have been very spectacular”

“People describe the moving light as overwhelming, extremely beautiful, and partially frightening. They describe it as a new years rocket that looks like a spinning spiral.”

The phenomenon lasted for a few minutes, just before eight on Wednesday morning. The meteorologist says the light apparently has come from the east.

The constellation of Orion holds much more than three stars in a row.    A deep exposure shows everything from dark nebula to star clusters, all imbedded in an extended patch of gaseous wisps in the greater Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The brightest three stars  on the far left are indeed the famous three stars that make up the belt of Orion.    Just below Alnitak, the lowest of the three belt stars, is the Flame Nebula, glowing with excited hydrogen gas and immersed in filaments of dark brown dust.    Below the frame center and just to the right of Alnitak lies the Horsehead Nebula, a   dark indentation of dense dust that has perhaps the most recognized nebular shapes on the sky.  On the upper right lies M42, the Orion Nebula, an energetic caldron of tumultuous gas, visible to the unaided eye, that is giving birth to a new open cluster of stars.    Immediately to the left of M42 is a prominent bluish reflection nebula sometimes called the Running Man that houses many bright blue stars.    The above image, a digitally stitched composite taken over several nights, covers an area with objects that are roughly 1,500 light years away and spans about 75 light years.

The constellation of Orion holds much more than three stars in a row. A deep exposure shows everything from dark nebula to star clusters, all imbedded in an extended patch of gaseous wisps in the greater Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The brightest three stars on the far left are indeed the famous three stars that make up the belt of Orion. Just below Alnitak, the lowest of the three belt stars, is the Flame Nebula, glowing with excited hydrogen gas and immersed in filaments of dark brown dust. Below the frame center and just to the right of Alnitak lies the Horsehead Nebula, a dark indentation of dense dust that has perhaps the most recognized nebular shapes on the sky. On the upper right lies M42, the Orion Nebula, an energetic caldron of tumultuous gas, visible to the unaided eye, that is giving birth to a new open cluster of stars. Immediately to the left of M42 is a prominent bluish reflection nebula sometimes called the Running Man that houses many bright blue stars. The above image, a digitally stitched composite taken over several nights, covers an area with objects that are roughly 1,500 light years away and spans about 75 light years.

oh god it’s full of stars

oh god it’s full of stars

From Sagittarius to Scorpius, the central Milky Way is a truly beautiful part of planet Earth’s night sky.  The gorgeous region is captured here, an expansive gigapixel mosaic of 52 fields spanning 34 by 20 degrees in 1200 individual images and 200 hours of exposure time.  Part of ESO’s Gigagalaxy Zoom Project, the images were collected over 29 nights with a small telescope under the exceptionally clear, dark skies of the ESO Paranal Observatory in Chile.  The breathtaking cosmic vista shows off intricate dust lanes, bright nebulae, and star clusters scattered through our galaxy’s rich central starfields.  Starting on the left, look for the Lagoon and Trifid nebulae, the Cat’s Paw, the Pipe dark nebula, and the colorful clouds of Rho Ophiuchi and Antares (right).

From Sagittarius to Scorpius, the central Milky Way is a truly beautiful part of planet Earth’s night sky. The gorgeous region is captured here, an expansive gigapixel mosaic of 52 fields spanning 34 by 20 degrees in 1200 individual images and 200 hours of exposure time. Part of ESO’s Gigagalaxy Zoom Project, the images were collected over 29 nights with a small telescope under the exceptionally clear, dark skies of the ESO Paranal Observatory in Chile. The breathtaking cosmic vista shows off intricate dust lanes, bright nebulae, and star clusters scattered through our galaxy’s rich central starfields. Starting on the left, look for the Lagoon and Trifid nebulae, the Cat’s Paw, the Pipe dark nebula, and the colorful clouds of Rho Ophiuchi and Antares (right).

The Tarantula Nebula is more than 1,000 light-years in diameter — a giant star forming region within our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).  That cosmic arachnid lies left of center in this sharp, colorful telescopic image taken through narrow-band filters.  It covers a part of the LMC over 2,000 light-years across.  Within the Tarantula (NGC 2070), intense radiation, stellar winds and supernova shocks from the central young cluster of massive stars, cataloged as R136, energize the nebular glow and shape the spidery filaments.  Around the Tarantula are other violent star-forming regions with young star clusters, filaments and bubble-shaped clouds.  The rich field is about as wide as the full Moon on the sky, located in the southern constellation Dorado.

The Tarantula Nebula is more than 1,000 light-years in diameter — a giant star forming region within our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). That cosmic arachnid lies left of center in this sharp, colorful telescopic image taken through narrow-band filters. It covers a part of the LMC over 2,000 light-years across. Within the Tarantula (NGC 2070), intense radiation, stellar winds and supernova shocks from the central young cluster of massive stars, cataloged as R136, energize the nebular glow and shape the spidery filaments. Around the Tarantula are other violent star-forming regions with young star clusters, filaments and bubble-shaped clouds. The rich field is about as wide as the full Moon on the sky, located in the southern constellation Dorado.

What is left over after stars collide?    To help answer this question, astronomers have been studying the center of the most massive ball of stars in our Milky Way Galaxy.    In the center of globular cluster Omega Centauri, stars are packed in 10,000 times more densely than near our Sun.    Pictured above, the newly upgraded Hubble Space Telescope has resolved the very center of Omega Centauri into individual stars.    Visible are many faint yellow-white stars that are smaller than our Sun, several yellow-orange stars that are Red Giants, and an occasional blue star.    When two stars collide they likely either combine to form one more massive star, or they stick, forming a new binary star system.    Close binary stars interact, sometimes emitting ultraviolet or X-ray light when gas falls from one star onto the surface of a compact companion such as a white dwarf or neutron star.    Two such binaries have now been located in Omega Centauri's center.    The star cluster lies about 15,000 light-years away and is visible toward the constellation of Centaurus.

What is left over after stars collide? To help answer this question, astronomers have been studying the center of the most massive ball of stars in our Milky Way Galaxy. In the center of globular cluster Omega Centauri, stars are packed in 10,000 times more densely than near our Sun. Pictured above, the newly upgraded Hubble Space Telescope has resolved the very center of Omega Centauri into individual stars. Visible are many faint yellow-white stars that are smaller than our Sun, several yellow-orange stars that are Red Giants, and an occasional blue star. When two stars collide they likely either combine to form one more massive star, or they stick, forming a new binary star system. Close binary stars interact, sometimes emitting ultraviolet or X-ray light when gas falls from one star onto the surface of a compact companion such as a white dwarf or neutron star. Two such binaries have now been located in Omega Centauri's center. The star cluster lies about 15,000 light-years away and is visible toward the constellation of Centaurus.